SALE
Zurück
Vor
Zurück zur Übersicht
  • Ab 55 € versandkostenfrei (innerhalb DE)
  • DHL Versand - Auslieferung auch Samstags
  • Über 60.000 Artikel direkt ab Lager lieferbar.

Connie Francis Conny & Clyde - Hit Songs Of The Thirties (CD)

Conny & Clyde - Hit Songs Of The Thirties (CD)
 
 
Benachrichtigen Sie mich, wenn der Artikel lieferbar ist.
 
 

Artikel-Nr.: CD5316870

Gewicht in Kg: 0,100

49,95 € *
 
 

Connie Francis: Conny & Clyde - Hit Songs Of The Thirties (CD)

(1968)

Bonnie & Clyde premiered on August 13, 1967, in New York City and became not only a surprise hit but one of the most successful motion pictures of the 1960s. Directed by Arthur Penn, it starred Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty as the 1930s gangster couple Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow who steal cars, rob stores and banks, hurt and kill people, and are - just as they intend to start a life away from crime - shot to death by a special police force.

The film was scored with period style music by Charles Strouse and featured a number of popular songs from that age as source music. Its huge success (the film won two Academy Awards( trig-gered renewed public interest in the music of the "Roaring '30s.- Quite a few artists picked up that trend and recorded '30s themed albums, some of them even more than hinted at their inspiration, like Mel Torme with A Day In The Life Of Bonnie And Clyde (Liberty, 1968) and Brigitte Bardot and Serge Gainsbourg with Bonnie And Clyde (Fontana, 1968).

The success of the film obviously also came up during a meeting of the executives at MGM Records with their most important artist, Connie Francis, in March 1968. The singer, whose career was launched in 1958 with the revival of a song from 1923, "Who's Sorry Now?,- had, in a breathtakingly short period, become the most successful female singer the world over. She was the first vocalist that had decided, against fierce resistance of her label and management early on, to record her songs not only in Eng-lish but other leading languages. It was the start of a successful trend, although none of the artists that followed her idea were able to have the same success in worldwide markets that Con-nie gained with her German, French, Italian, Spanish and even Japanese-language recordings. This and her deliberate versatil-ity of style had made her an exceptional artist with a scope rang-ing from pop, rock 'n' roll, standards, jazz, country & western, songs from films and musicals to Christmas and even children's repertoire. With 300 million records sold, Connie Francis is still one of the most successful vocalists of all time.

With albums like Songs To A Swinging Band (1961), A New Kind Of Connie (1964) and Happiness - Connie Francis On Broadway To-day (1967), Connie had already demonstrated her appreciation of and talent for swinging tunes and the Great American Songbook. Either this or the irresistible wordplay of Bonnie/Connie may
have led to Francis deciding to record an album of songs from the 1930s. In those days, Connie was referred to as the "queen of MGM" and her contract, most unusual at the time, allowed her to decide for herself what she would record, with whom and what would end up on record.

Directly after the meeting, Connie enthusiastically started put-ting the project together. Creative and repertoire ideas came from, among others, her parents, George and Ida Franconero, her personal assistant Patrick Niglio, and MGM Marketing/Sales executive Lennie Scheer. To arrange it all, Connie chose the fan-tastically talented Don Costa (1925-83), who had worked with artists like Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Steve Lawrence & Eydie Gorme, and with whom she had already cooperated on sev-eral earlier projects. Her long-time musical director, Joe Mazzu, would also be part of the team.

Everyone must have dived headfirst into the project, because the recording sessions were scheduled only a few months out for May 1968. In a short time span unthinkable in today's music world, on May 6, 7 and 11, the whole album was recorded and issued not much later at the end of May 1968. The sessions were done live with orchestra - no playback or overdubs - and even today Connie still fondly remembers those creative days, the enthusiasm of everyone involved and the feeling to have created something truly special.
Connie commissioned the music & lyrics for the album's opener CONNIE AND CLYDE from Bob Arthur, musical director of The Ed Sullivan Show. The lyrics are an amusing melange of 1930s names, topics and language.

YOU OUGHTA BE IN PICTURES was originally written for the revue Ziegfeld Follies Of 1934 and recorded the same year by, among others, Rudy Vallee, the Boswell Sisters and Little Jack Little & his Orchestra. Don Costa gives the first 32 bars a fake nostalgic gramophone sound before jumping into broad, modern stereo, while the lyrics update the list of historic male hotties.
Connie obviously had fun with ACE IN THE HOLE, a song about the kind of fellow that can be found at any place and age: the con man boasting about his own importance and achievements.
WITH PLENTY OF MONEY AND YOU / WE'RE IN THE MONEY are songs from the pen of Harry Warren & Al Dubin and get straight to the main point of interest during the dark age of depression: money! The first one, carrying the sub-title "The Gold Diggers' Lullaby," was originally heard in the film Gold Diggers Of 1937, sung by Dick Powell over the opening credits, the second one is from Gold Diggers Of 1933 and was originally performed by Ginger Rogers.

The 1928 German-language original of JUST A GIGOLO was about the social decline of an ex-hussar of the Austrian-Hun-garian army who had to make a living as a gigolo after World War !. Most of those historic connotations were left off in the English version released a year later. Connie Francis' version simply tells the story of a male taxi-dancer sentimentally re-flecting on his better days. Her usual vocal perfection is pep-pered with a dash of appropriate irony.
The charming BUTTON UP YOUR OVERCOAT, basically a list of health recommendations for a loved one, was originally written for the 1928 Broadway show Follow Thru and recorded by Ruth Etting the same year. A year later, Helen Kane had even greater success with the song. The writers, Buddy DeSylva, Lew Brown & Ray Henderson, were also responsible for the 1928 song "Together," Connie's 1961 million-seller.

BROTHER, CAN YOU SPARE A DIME, written for the 1932 revue New Americana, became the unofficial hymn of the Great Depression. It questions why those men who built the railroads and skyscrapers and were sent to the battlefields now had to beg for their bread when the work was done. A lot of the many recordings of the song were quiet and resigned. Connie opens her interpretation the same way, but then gradually spi-rals to a grand finale, emotionally belting out "Brother, can't you spare just one dime?" This is no begging anymore but a pow-erful cry for justice, projected with extraordinary vocal power.
MAYBE, first published in 1935, became a hit for the Ink Spots, Dinah Shore and Bobby Byrne. Like in Francis' first million-seller, "Who's Sorry Now?," the protagonist wonders if her "ex" mightstill be thinking of her and what he will do when his new flame turns her back on him. Might he come back ... maybe?
AM I BLUE?, originally written for the film On With The Show! (1929) and performed by Ethel Waters, is another vocal tour de force by Miss Francis, who questions whether she should really be blue now that her lover is gone and if she was ever happy with him to begin with. The brilliance of her performance not only shines during the strong-voiced sections but also the re-strained, intimate moments.

Gene Austin had a huge hit with PLEASE DON'T TALK ABOUT ME WHEN I'M GONE in 1931. Connie had already performed the song live and on TV shows before singing it here to a fabu-lous blown-up Dixieland arrangement courtesy of Don Costa.
AIN'T MISBEHAVIN' is another Dixieland-flavored classic that 'Fats' Waller wrote for the 1929 revue Connie's Hot Choco-lates. Here, the other Connie can be experienced as a wall-flow-er that won't leave the house, won't look at any other man, only hoping "he" won't misbehave and will come home soon. Her tongue-in-cheek performance makes it obvious that she sym-pathizes with the song rather than with its message.

SOMEBODY ELSE IS TAKING MY PLACE was success-fully recorded by co-author Russ Morgan in 1937 and again by Benny Goodman with Peggy Lee in 1942. Connie's version was issued as single (MGM K 13948) and has the most pop-flavored arrangement of the album. It tells the story of a poor woman whose ex-lover has not only forgotten her but all the promises he made.
Although the versatile Miss Francis performs this and other tear-jerkers from the album, touching as ever, from the per-spective of a passive female victim, Connie & Clyde once more proved that in real life she was very much in-command and on an artistic peak. In the three short recording days, an album of the highest artistic degree was created at Columbia Recording Studios New York: a work that once more proved the exceptional position Francis held in the American entertainment business. Connie & Clyde is much more than just Connie's own favorite al-bum. It is a pop music milestone, unjustly overshadowed by her more popular chart hits, ripe for rediscovery today!
Wilfried Weiler, July 2011


 

Songs

Connie Francis - Conny & Clyde - Hit Songs Of The Thirties (CD) Medium 1
1: Connie & Clyde
2: You Oughta Be In Pictures
3: Ace In The Hole
4: Gold Digger's Medley: With Plenty Of Money An
5: Just A Gigolo
6: Button Up Your Overcoat
7: Brother, Can You Spare A Dime?
8: Maybe
9: Am I Blue?
10: Please Don't Talk About Me When I'm Gone
11: Ain't Misbehavin'
12: Somebody Else Is Taking My Place
13: Bonus Tracks:
14: Will You Still Be Mine
15: The Sweetest Sounds
16: Ma (He's Making Eyes At Me)
17: My Kind Of Guy
18: Hallelujah Baby
19: Walking Happy
20: If My Friends Could See Me Now/I'm A Brass Ba
21: Sherry!  

 

Artikeleigenschaften von Connie Francis: Conny & Clyde - Hit Songs Of The Thirties (CD)

  • Interpret: Connie Francis

  • Albumtitel: Conny & Clyde - Hit Songs Of The Thirties (CD)

  • Artikelart CD

  • Genre Pop

  • Music Genre Pop
  • Music Style Pop Vocal
  • Music Sub-Genre 281 Pop Vocal
  • Erscheinungsjahr 2011
  • Label POLYDOR

  • SubGenre Pop - Vocal Pop

  • EAN: 0600753168707

  • Gewicht in Kg: 0.100
 
 

Interpreten-Beschreibung "Francis, Connie"

Connie Francis

Geboren am 12. 12. 1938 als Concetta Rosa Maria Franconero in Newark, US-Bundesstaat New Jersey.

Als Elfjährige wurde Connie Francies während einer Talentshow entdeckt, sechs Jahre später erhielt sie einen Vertrag von MGM. Ihre erste Single ('Freddy') erschien 1955, die, wie einige andere mehr, zunächst unbeachtet blieb.

Erst 1958 funkte es, 'Who's Sorry Now' (Baujahr 1923) wurde ihr erster Chart-Treffer in den USA, dem bis 1969 noch 54 weitere folgen sollten. In England brachte die erfolgreichste Sängerin der 50er und 60er Jahre 24 Titel in die Hitlisten (1958 - 66), von ihren 35 deutschsprachigen Original-Singles platzierten sich 23 zwischen 1960 und 1970. Keine andere Interpretin weltweit nutzte so geschickt die Zeit- spanne nach der Hoch-Zeit des Rock'n'Roll und dem Beginn der Beat-Ära. Als die goldenen Jahre von Connie Francis vorüber waren, setzte sie sich für UNICEF ein, ging als singende Truppenbetreuerin nach Vietnam. Seit 1960 war sie auch in diversen US-Filmen zu sehen und zu hören, etwa “Where The Boys Are' ('Dazu gehören zwei', 1960), “Follow The Boys' ('Mein Schiff fährt zu dir', 1962), “Looking For Love' ('Ich wär' so gern verliebt', 1963) und 'When Boy Meets Girl' ('Boy meiner Träume', 1965).

1974 wurde sie nach einem Auftritt im Westbury Theatre vor den Toren New Yorks überfallen und vergewaltigt- ein Verbrechen, von dem sie sich lange Jahre psychisch nicht erholte. Anfang der 80er absolvierte sie wieder Gastspiele, doch gegen Ende des Jahrzehnts forderte ihre instabile Gesundheit erneut Tribut. Nach Sprachproblemen während einer Show im Londoner Palladium gab es ähnliche Anzeichen während eines TV-Gesprächs im amerikanischen Fernsehen. 1991 brach Connie Francis während eines Konzerts in New Jersey zusammen. 1992 erlebten mehrere Francis-Titel in Deutschland eine Renaissance: Die Medleys “Jive Connie' und '(10, Connie, Go' schossen in den Hitlisten ganz nach oben.

1993 nahm sie in München mit Peter Kraus für Sonys Herzklang-Label die Duette 'Que Sera' und “So nah' auf- in England wurde ein Song aus einer TV-Serie zum Überraschungs-Hit: 'Lipstick On Your Collar' aus dem Jahr 1959.

Aus dem Bear Family Buch - 1000 Nadelstiche von Bernd Matheja - BFB10025 -

 

Connie Francis

Connie Rocks 


Die Rock'n'Roll-Ära war ein Jungenclub. Die meisten der meistverkauften Künstler waren männlich: Nur wenige Künstlerinnen konnten sich mit ihnen messen. Von den Frauen dieser Zeit war Connie Francis die mit Abstand meistverkaufte. Rock'n' Roll war Testosteron-reiche Musik, und Connie erkannte schon früh in ihrer Karriere, dass sie nicht mit einem Banshee Rockabilly Wail loslegen konnte, aber sie konnte sehr glaubwürdige Rock'n' Roll Musik machen, die ihrem Hintergrund und ihrem einzigartigen Talent gerecht wurde.

Connie wurde am 12. Dezember 1938 in Newark, New Jersey, als Concetta Maria Franconero geboren. Ihre Eltern waren in den Vereinigten Staaten in italienischen Einwandererfamilien geboren. Connie's Großvater väterlicherseits kam 1905 mit einer zerschlagenen Ziehharmonika und wenig mehr. Connie saß auf der Treppe ihres Hauses und lernte die Volkslieder aus dem alten Land. Es wurde schnell klar, dass sie Talent hatte, und begann, bei Einstiegswettbewerben in und um New Jersey aufzutreten, zu singen und Akkordeon zu spielen. Connie's Vater, George Franconero, interessierte sich für ihre aufkeimende Karriere und nahm sie mit nach New York, um sie in eine Kinderfernsehsendung "Startime" zu bringen. "Wir haben den Produzenten der Show, George Scheck, der ein Taxi rief, angehalten", sagte Connie später. "Mein Vater sagte: "Würdest du meiner Tochter beim Singen zuhören?" Er sagte: "Ich bin bis hierhin in den Sängerinnen und Sängern. Ich kann keine Sänger gebrauchen." Da hat mir das Akkordeon das Leben gerettet. Scheck sagte, dass er ihr ein Vorsprechen geben würde, wenn sie Akkordeon spielen würde, und sie war vier Jahre lang bei'Startime'. Schließlich wurde Scheck ihr Manager.

1950 erschien Connie von Küste zu Küste auf "Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts" und war in den nächsten Jahren oft im Fernsehen zu sehen. Es war übrigens Godfrey, die vorgeschlagen hat, dass sie ihren Namen in Connie Francis ändert. Mit vierzehn Jahren überquerte Connie den Fluss nach New York und sang Demonstrationsscheiben für Musikverlage. 1955 finanzierte Lou Levy bei Leeds Music eine Session mit George Scheck und brachte die Meister gemeinsam zu den Plattenfirmen. Der einzige Abnehmer war der A&R-Mann von MGM Records, Harry Meyerson. Einer der Songs auf dem Demo-Tape war einer mit dem Titel Freddy, und Connie wurde später gesagt, dass Meyerson sie nur signierte, weil sein Sohn Freddy hieß und er dachte, die Platte würde ein gutes Geburtstagsgeschenk sein.

Die frühen Singles machten wenig Geschäfte, und Connie wurde Jim Vienneau übergeben, der mit dem Gründungspräsidenten von MGM Records, Frank Walker, verwandt war. Vienneau erhielt die Verantwortung, MGM in die Rock'n'Roll-Ära zu bringen, und er fand einen Song für Connie namens Eighteen. Sie signalisierte eine neue Richtung und die erste Reaktion war vielversprechend, aber auch sie blieb aus. Nach neun aufeinanderfolgenden Flops wurde Connie gesagt, dass sie einen letzten Schuss auf MGM bekommen würde, bevor sie fallen gelassen wurde. Zwei Personen führten Connie's Karriere, George Scheck und ihr Vater, George Franconero. Auf Drängen ihres Vaters nahm Connie einen alten Jazz-Pop-Song, Who's Sorry Now, mit einem zweispurigen Gesang ähnlich Patti Page auf. "Mein Vater", sagte Connie, "hatte ein Ohr für das, was die Leute von mir wollten, das war unheimlich. Bei der letzten Sitzung sagte er: "Hier ist ein Lied, das ich dir in den letzten anderthalb Jahren in den Hals stecken wollte." Ich sagte:'Sag mir nicht, dass es wieder dieses Lied von 1923 ist. Haben die Leute 1923 tatsächlich ihre Namen geschrieben? Ich mache es nicht." Er sagte: "Nur zu, nimm noch eine Bombe, und du beendest deine Karriere." Ich bin überrascht, dass sie so lange bei dir geblieben sind. Ich sag dir was. Tu mir einen großen Gefallen. Tu so, als würde ich morgen sterben und das ist mein letzter Wunsch. Du suchst dir deine üblichen drei Klamotten aus und wirfst sie für mich rein.'"

George Franconero hatte natürlich Recht. Veröffentlicht im November 1957, Who's Sorry Now? erhielt ein wenig Airplay im ganzen Land, aber nicht gestartet, bis MGM's Philadelphia Distributor, Ed Barsky, eine Kopie an Dick Clark brachte. "Dick hörte ein Geräusch in mir, das ganz anders war", sagte Connie später. "Die Reaktion war einfach phänomenal. Er spielte es drei Monate lang jeden Tag." Connie gibt freiwillig zu, dass sie ihren Erfolg Dick Clark und den wiederholten Auftritten auf'American Bandstand' zu verdanken hat. Wenn nicht für ihn, wäre sie fallen gelassen worden, als ihr Vertrag abgelaufen war. Who's Sorry Now? erreichte Platz 3 in'Cash Box', Platz 4 in'Billboard' und Platz 1 in England.

Ein weiterer überarbeiteter Oldie wurde als Nachfolger veröffentlicht, aber auch nicht annähernd. Damals schlug der Musikverleger Donnie Kirshner vor, zwei junge Songwriter zu hören, die er gerade unterschrieben hatte, Neil Sedaka und Howie Greenfield. Nachdem Sedaka und Greenfield alle ihre Balladen gespielt hatten, sagte Connie, dass sie etwas peppigeres hören wollte. Neil beschloss, Stupid Cupid zu spielen (was laut Howard Greenfield für Sal Mineo geschrieben wurde und dann den Shepherd Sisters versprochen wurde). Connie liebte es, und Neil kam zu Connie's Session am 18. Juni 1958, um Klavier zu spielen. Innerhalb eines Monats war Stupid Cupid unter den Top 20. Die B-Seite war ein älteres Lied aus dem Jahr 1929, Carolina Moon. Die Kombination wurde zu einem doppelseitigen Erfolg, so dass es kaum verwunderlich war, dass sich Connie für ihre nächste Single, Fallin', an Sedaka und Greenfield wandte, aber sie blieb kurz vor den Top 30 stehen, was zu einer Rückkehr zu den Oldies führte. My Happiness, ein Song aus der Depressions-Ära, der 1948 ein großer Hit war, krönte ein unglaubliches Jahr, als er Connie's größter Hit bis zu diesem Punkt wurde. 1958 war das Jahr, in dem Connie Francis ankam, und sie würde für weitere zehn Jahre nicht aus den Charts verschwinden.

1959 eröffnet mit Connie, die Songs für ihre nächste Single in Betracht zieht. Sie mochte einen, den der erfahrene Musikverleger, Leonard Joy, rübergeschickt hat, Lipstick On Your Collar. Jetzt brauchte sie eine B-Seite. "Howie Greenfield war mein Lieblingstexter", sagte sie zu William Ruhlmann. "Jedes Mal, wenn eine Session aufkam, saß ich tagelang in meinem Büro und hörte mir jeden Verleger, jeden Songwriter an, aber Neil und Howie hatten immer einen Hit für mich. Es war eine tolle Ehe. Wir dachten genauso. Neil und Howie und ich haben den Song'Frankie' geplant. Neil würde sagen: "Okay, was hast du auf dem Herzen, Concetta?" Ich sagte:'Sieh dir das an. Ich habe eine Liste gemacht. Alle diese Lieder der letzten drei Jahre, ein Drittel davon sind Namen von Personen oder Orten. Eine Seite meiner neuen Single "Lipstick" wird uptempo sein, also möchte ich eine verträumte, langsame Tanzballade für die andere Seite." Neil sagte: "Okay." Am nächsten Tag war'Frankie' da." Wer war Frankie?

Die Geschichte wurde erzählt, dass das Lied ein Valentinsgruß für Frankie Avalon war, der in "Jamboree", dem Film, für den Connie die geisterhafte Singstimme der weiblichen Hauptrolle spielte. Aber nicht jeder mochte es. Am 15. April 1959 nahm Connie es mit dem Arrangeur Ray Ellis auf. "Die Musik beginnt, und ich sage: "Frankie, wo immer du bist, ich liebe dich." Ray Ellis sagte:'Das ist zu viel für mich. Ich kann damit nicht umgehen. Das ist so eine Scheiße." Ich sagte:'Es steht im Protokoll. Die Kinder mögen das Zeug. Entspann dich einfach, ich mache es." Er sagte: "Du wirst keinen Treffer haben." Ich sagte: "Lass meine Mutter sich darum kümmern." Aber ein Hit war es: ein doppelseitiger Top 10 Smash. Die gleiche Session produzierte auch den Nachfolger, Eddie Curtis' You're Gonna Miss Me (Curtis schrieb später Songs für Connie's'Do The Twist' LP). Die Kehrseite von You're Gonna Miss Me war Plenty Good Lovin', das erste Mal hatte Connie einen ihrer eigenen Songs auf einer Single platziert.

Pünktlich zu Weihnachten 1959 unternahm MGM den beispiellosen Schritt, fünf Connie Francis-Alben auf einmal zu veröffentlichen. Es gab ein Weihnachtsalbum, ein Countryalbum, ein italienisches Album, ein Greatest Hits Album und eine Sammlung von Rock'n' Roll Millionenverkäufern. Wirklich etwas für jeden Geschmack. Vom Rock'n' Roll-Album haben wir Tweedle Dee, I Hear You Knockin' und den Durchbruch für MGM-Labelpartner Conway Twitty, It's Only Make Believe genommen. Und 1959, wie 1958, schloss sie mit einem weiteren Lied von Connie Francis in den Charts, diesmal ein Revival eines britischen Liedes von 1927, Among My Souvenirs, das sie in einer Publikation namens'The Musicians Handbook' gefunden hatte.

Es erreichte Platz 7, als das Jahr zu Ende ging. Am 12. Dezember 1959 wurde Connie Francis 21 Jahre alt, und kurz vor Weihnachten erreichte sie mit dem Ausverkauf der Carnegie Hall einen der Höhepunkte des Erfolgs im Popmusikgeschäft. In Vertragsgesprächen mit MGM hatte sie eine beispiellose künstlerische Kontrolle über ihre Aufnahmen erreicht. Sie war einundzwanzig und hatte ihr Leben und ihre Karriere unter Kontrolle. Im folgenden April erhielt sie eine Auszeichnung als Bestseller-Sängerin von der Plattenindustrie-Handelsgruppe NARM (National Association of Record Merchandisers).

 
Presseartikel über Connie Francis - Conny & Clyde - Hit Songs Of The Thirties (CD)
Kundenbewertungen für "Conny & Clyde - Hit Songs Of The Thirties (CD)"
 
Bewertungen werden nach Überprüfung freigeschaltet.
Schreiben Sie eine Bewertung für den Artikel "Connie Francis: Conny & Clyde - Hit Songs Of The Thirties (CD)"
 
 
 
 
 
 

Die mit einem * markierten Felder sind Pflichtfelder.

 
 
Allman, Gregg: Live In San...

Inhalt: 1.0000

21,95 € *

Rush, Otis: Live At...

Inhalt: 1.0000

6,75 € * Statt: 17,95 € *

McDowell, Ronnie: A Tribute To...

Inhalt: 1.0000

19,95 € *

Robins: Rockin' With...

Inhalt: 1.0000

15,95 € *

Presley, Elvis: From...

Inhalt: 1.0000

19,95 € *

Davis Jr., Sammy: Yes I Can !...

Inhalt: 1.0000

79,90 € *

Copas, Lloyd...: Complete...

Inhalt: 1.0000

17,95 € *

Clovers, The: The Feelin'...

Inhalt: 1.0000

16,95 € *

Honeybus: She Flies...

Inhalt: 1.0000

49,95 € *

Day, Doris: Show Time -...

Inhalt: 1.0000

24,95 € *

Ritter, Tex: Lady...

Inhalt: 1.0000

29,95 € *

Mack, Warner: Baby Squeeze...

Inhalt: 1.0000

11,96 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Torriani, Vico: Biedermann...

Inhalt: 1.0000

13,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Francis, Connie: Christmas In...

Inhalt: 1.0000

24,95 € * Statt: 29,95 € *

Francis, Connie: Portrait Of...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € *

Sledge, Percy: The Best Of...

Inhalt: 1.0000

9,95 € * Statt: 14,95 € *

Bland, Bobby 'Blue': Dreamer (LP,...

Inhalt: 1.0000

17,95 € * Statt: 19,95 € *

Brooks, Garth: Ultimate...

Inhalt: 1.0000

79,95 € *

Haley, Bill & His...: Bill Haley's...

Inhalt: 1.0000

23,96 € * Statt: 29,95 € *

Muddy Waters: After The...

Inhalt: 1.0000

24,95 € *

Steele, Tommy: Tommy Steele...

Inhalt: 1.0000

15,26 € * Statt: 16,95 € *

Shakin' Stevens: Echoes Of...

Inhalt: 1.0000

21,21 € * Statt: 24,95 € *

Ventures, The: The...

Inhalt: 1.0000

17,95 € * Statt: 19,95 € *

King, Evelyn: The Complete...

Inhalt: 1.0000

19,95 € *

Cadillac Three, The: Bury Me In...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € *

Shindo, Tak: MGANGA! (CD)

Inhalt: 1.0000

16,95 € *

Four Seasons, The: 20 Greatest...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € *

Cruncher, The: The Cruncher...

Inhalt: 1.0000

13,56 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Presley, Elvis: Elvis -...

Inhalt: 1.0000

29,95 € *

Various: Kinked!...

Inhalt: 1.0000

13,08 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Ross, Diana & The...: Merry...

Inhalt: 1.0000

15,95 € *

Mountain Of Power: Volume Three...

Inhalt: 1.0000

18,95 € *

Hutto, J.B.: Hawk Squat

Inhalt: 1.0000

16,75 € *

Lynn, Loretta: Full Circle

Inhalt: 1.0000

16,95 € *

Presley, Elvis: The Ed...

Inhalt: 1.0000

9,97 € * Statt: 19,95 € *

Presley, Elvis: Golden...

Inhalt: 1.0000

29,95 € *

Love, Darlene: Introducing...

Inhalt: 1.0000

19,95 € * Statt: 24,95 € *

Lovin' Spoonful, The: Do You...

Inhalt: 1.0000

26,95 € *

Jan & Dean: Command...

Inhalt: 1.0000

27,95 € *

Various - They...: Vol.3, The...

Inhalt: 1.0000

11,96 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

 
 
Zuletzt angesehen