SALE
Zurück
Vor
Zurück zur Übersicht
  • Ab 55 € versandkostenfrei (innerhalb DE)
  • DHL Versand - Auslieferung auch Samstags
  • Über 50.000 Artikel direkt ab Lager lieferbar.

Mack Vickery Live At The Alabama Women's Prison, plus

Artikel-Nr.: BCD16994

Gewicht in Kg: 0,115

 

Sofort versandfertig, Lieferzeit** 1-3 Werktage

Statt: 15,95 € * (6.27 % gespart)
14,95 € *
 
 
 
 
 

Mack Vickery: Live At The Alabama Women's Prison, plus

Video von Mack Vickery - Live At The Alabama Women's Prison, plus

1-CD mit 20-seitigem Booklet, 13 Titel, Spieldauer 39 Minuten.

'Ein 'Knast-Album' ' aber noch eindringlicher als die von Johnny Cash. 'Eines der spektakulärsten (und geschmacklosesten) Cover der Musikgeschichte. 'Mega-seltene Debüt-LP des Rockabilly-Sängers, der für Sun und Gone aufnahm und Songs für Jerry Lee Lewis sowie viele andere schrieb. CD enthält als Bonus eine ehemalige Single: die Originalversion von Jerry Lees Meat Man.

Mack Vickery komponierte Erfolgstitel für Jerry Lee Lewis, George Strait, Tanya Tucker, Waylon Jennings, Johnny Paycheck und viele andere. In den 50er Jahren nahm er Platten für Sun und Gone Records auf. 1970 war Mack Vickerys Debütalbum 'Live At The Alabama Women's Prison' ein echter Klassiker, der jetzt weltweit erstmals wiederveröffentlicht wird. Die Scheibe steckt in einem der spektakulärsten Originalcover aller Zeiten ' und die Musik ist nicht minder beeindruckend: Mack Vickery sang wie um sein Leben, vor inhaftierten Frauen, die sich nach Musik, Liebe und Zuneigung sehnten. Gegen die LP gab es heftige Widerstände, und die Original-Plattenfirma war schnell pleite

1-CD mit 20-seitigem Booklet, 13 Titel, Spieldauer 39 Minuten


 

Songs

Wird geladen...

 

Artikeleigenschaften von Mack Vickery: Live At The Alabama Women's Prison, plus

  • Interpret: Mack Vickery

  • Albumtitel: Live At The Alabama Women's Prison, plus

  • Artikelart CD

  • Genre Country

  • Music Genre Country Music
  • Music Style Classic Country Artists
  • Music Sub-Genre 002 Classic Country Artists
  • Label Bear Family Records

  • Preiscode AH
  • SubGenre Country - General

  • EAN: 4000127169945

  • Gewicht in Kg: 0.115
 
 

Interpreten-Beschreibung "Vickery, Mack"

Willard Mack Vickery

A legend within an admittedly small circle, Willard Mack Vickery is chiefly known among rockabilly fans for a few records on long-gone labels and for writing songs that spoke to Jerry Lee Lewis on many levels. But he also wrote top-selling songs for Tanya Tucker, Waylon Jennings, George Strait, Johnny Paycheck, and many others. We catch up with him in 1970 at the unlikeliest of all places, the Alabama Women's Prison. His 'Live At The Alabama Women's Prison' LP, featured one of the all-time most striking jacket designs, and the music was no less impressive. Mack Vickery sang his heart out in front of convicted females starved for music, love and affection.

Only a few Porter Wagoner albums were housed in jackets as epically tasteless as 'Live At the Alabama Women's Prison'. With four fabulously attractive women behind bars, it's hard to tell if the convicts want to get out or if the singer wants to get in. Were these women typical of the population at the Alabama Women's Prison? Probably not. Were they even part of the inmate population in Alabama or anywhere? Almost certainly not.

When asked about the recording Mack Vickery's reply was short: "Hot, it sure was hot." Vickery might have performed in front of bigger audiences, but never one so passionate. The idea came after hearing Cash's 'Live At Folsom Prison' and it took some serious effort to get permission to bring musicians and recording equipment inside the building. According to Vickery's long-time associate, songwriter Merle Kilgore, Vickery went down to Alabama and got buddy-buddy with the female warden. After a few drinks she was talked into letting the singer come down to record. Vickery came on stage shaking like Elvis and the women went wild. The unknown man in the equation was songwriter Alex Zanetis, who'd written hits for Brenda Lee (As Usual), Jim Reeves (Guilty), and others. An article in the 'Nashville Tennessean' in October 1970 states that Zanetis "has just finished an album of prison songs for women," so it seems likely that the project originated with him rather than Vickery. Zanetis certainly produced the record.

Eighty percent of the convicts at Julia Tutwiler Prison were inside for killing cheating husbands or two-timing lovers. Vickery took notice and picked his repertoire carefully. Titles such as Life Turned Her That Way, A Woman Who Walks On The Wild Side, Alabama Women's Prison Blues and Walk A Mile In My Shoes fit the occasion perfectly. On this CD, the original album has been expanded with the non-album single, Meat Man b/w The Farther I Let Her Go, originating from Vickery's short stint with Mega Records. From correspondence left by Mega's president, Brad McCuen, it seems as if the single was originally meant to be Meat Man backed with a song that has disappeared, Boston's Busiest Peeping Tom. That single was intended to be released under the name Cutty Love, but they eventually opted for Atlanta James and changed the B-side.

Mack Vickery's recording history way predates 'Live At The Alabama Women's Prison.' Born in Town Creek, Alabama, on June 8, 1938, he moved around the Ohio valley and Tennessee before eventually settling in the Detroit area. In 1957, he and some buddies auditioned at Sun, and Vickery says that Sam Phillips told him to stick around, but he returned home instead. The following year, he recorded for the Santa Monica, California-based Princeton Records. High School Blues was his first record, and Vickery says that it was recorded at Cobra's studio in Chicago with Otis Rush and Wild Bill Emerson on guitars. High School Blues reached the attention of one of George Goldner's promo men, who gave him Goldner's phone number. Vickery recalled phoning Goldner one Sunday evening, saying  "I've got some songs that'll make you and me a million dollars." Goldner wouldn't be the last to hear that line, but he brought Vickery to New York, where he recorded A Lover's Plea. Vickery says it was breaking when Goldner was caught up in the payola investigations. There was a record for Jamie and another for Afco before Vickery's thoughts turned to songwriting.

from booklet BCD16994 - 

A legend within an admittedly small circle, Willard Mack Vickery is chiefly known among rockabilly fans for a few records on long-gone labels and for writing songs that spoke to Jerry Lee Lewis on many levels. But he also wrote top-selling songs for Tanya Tucker, Waylon Jennings, George Strait, Johnny Paycheck, and many others. We catch up with him in 1970 at the unlikeliest of all places, the Alabama Women's Prison. His 'Live At The Alabama Women's Prison' LP, featured one of the all-time most striking jacket designs, and the music was no less impressive. Mack Vickery sang his heart out in front of convicted females starved for music, love and affection.

 

Only a few Porter Wagoner albums were housed in jackets as epically tasteless as 'Live At the Alabama Women's Prison'. With four fabulously attractive women behind bars, it's hard to tell if the convicts want to get out or if the singer wants to get in. Were these women typical of the population at the Alabama Women's Prison? Probably not. Were they even part of the inmate population in Alabama or anywhere? Almost certainly not.

When asked about the recording Mack Vickery's reply was short: "Hot, it sure was hot." Vickery might have performed in front of bigger audiences, but never one so passionate. The idea came after hearing Cash's 'Live At Folsom Prison' and it took some serious effort to get permission to bring musicians and recording equipment inside the building. According to Vickery's long-time associate, songwriter Merle Kilgore, Vickery went down to Alabama and got buddy-buddy with the female warden. After a few drinks she was talked into letting the singer come down to record. Vickery came on stage shaking like Elvis and the women went wild. The unknown man in the equation was songwriter Alex Zanetis, who'd written hits for Brenda Lee (As Usual), Jim Reeves (Guilty), and others. An article in the 'Nashville Tennessean' in October 1970 states that Zanetis "has just finished an album of prison songs for women," so it seems likely that the project originated with him rather than Vickery. Zanetis certainly produced the record.

Eighty percent of the convicts at Julia Tutwiler Prison were inside for killing cheating husbands or two-timing lovers. Vickery took notice and picked his repertoire carefully. Titles such as Life Turned Her That Way, A Woman Who Walks On The Wild Side, Alabama Women's Prison Blues and Walk A Mile In My Shoes fit the occasion perfectly. On this CD, the original album has been expanded with the non-album single, Meat Man b/w The Farther I Let Her Go, originating from Vickery's short stint with Mega Records. From correspondence left by Mega's president, Brad McCuen, it seems as if the single was originally meant to be Meat Man backed with a song that has disappeared, Boston's Busiest Peeping Tom. That single was intended to be released under the name Cutty Love, but they eventually opted for Atlanta James and changed the B-side.

Mack Vickery's recording history way predates 'Live At The Alabama Women's Prison.' Born in Town Creek, Alabama, on June 8, 1938, he moved around the Ohio valley and Tennessee before eventually settling in the Detroit area. In 1957, he and some buddies auditioned at Sun, and Vickery says that Sam Phillips told him to stick around, but he returned home instead. The following year, he recorded for the Santa Monica, California-based Princeton Records. High School Blues was his first record, and Vickery says that it was recorded at Cobra's studio in Chicago with Otis Rush and Wild Bill Emerson on guitars. High School Blues reached the attention of one of George Goldner's promo men, who gave him Goldner's phone number. Vickery recalled phoning Goldner one Sunday evening, saying  "I've got some songs that'll make you and me a million dollars." Goldner wouldn't be the last to hear that line, but he brought Vickery to New York, where he recorded A Lover's Plea. Vickery says it was breaking when Goldner was caught up in the payola investigations. There was a record for Jamie and another for Afco before Vickery's thoughts turned to songwriting.

from booklet BCD16994 - Mack Vickery Live At The Alabama Women's Prison, plus
Read more at: https://www.bear-family.de/vickery-mack-live-at-the-alabama-women-s-prison-plus.html
Copyright © Bear Family Records

 
Kundenbewertungen für "Live At The Alabama Women's Prison, plus"
 
Bewertungen werden nach Überprüfung freigeschaltet.
Schreiben Sie eine Bewertung für den Artikel "Mack Vickery: Live At The Alabama Women's Prison, plus"
 
 
 
 
 
 

Die mit einem * markierten Felder sind Pflichtfelder.

 
 
Various - Cree...: Step Inside...

Inhalt: 1.0000

15,74 € *

Wilkins, Reverend...: Prodigal Son

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Various Artists: Unchained...

Inhalt: 1.0000

11,96 € * Statt: 14,95 € *

Perkins, Laura Lee: Don't Wait...

Inhalt: 1.0000

11,96 € * Statt: 14,95 € *

McGriff, Edna: Start...

Inhalt: 1.0000

11,96 € * Statt: 14,95 € *

Ford, Jim: Demolition...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Perkins, Carl: The Sun Era...

Inhalt: 1.0000

71,96 € * Statt: 89,95 € *

Clooney, Rosemary...: A Touch Of...

Inhalt: 1.0000

11,96 € * Statt: 14,95 € *

Ford, Jim: Point Of No...

Inhalt: 1.0000

15,95 € * Statt: 16,95 € *

Ford, Jim: Jim Ford -...

Inhalt: 1.0000

9,95 € * Statt: 11,95 € *

Prisonaires &...: Only...

Inhalt: 1.0000

11,96 € * Statt: 14,95 € *

Owens, Buck: Open Up Your...

Inhalt: 1.0000

139,95 € *

Ford, Jim: Big Mouth...

Inhalt: 1.0000

9,95 € * Statt: 11,95 € *

King, Freddie: Texas Flyer,...

Inhalt: 1.0000

87,96 € * Statt: 109,95 € *

Boone, Pat: The Sixties...

Inhalt: 1.0000

111,96 € * Statt: 139,95 € *

Thomas, Rufus: The Sun...

Inhalt: 1.0000

11,96 € * Statt: 14,95 € *

Lewis, Jerry Lee: Old Time...

Inhalt: 1.0000

11,96 € * Statt: 14,95 € *

Cash, Johnny: The Man In...

Inhalt: 1.0000

15,95 € * Statt: 16,95 € *

Laine, Frankie: Rawhide (9-CD)

Inhalt: 1.0000

188,95 € *

Norris: People

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Perkins, Carl: Back On Top...

Inhalt: 1.0000

63,96 € * Statt: 79,95 € *

Louie And The Lovers: The Complete...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Various - SUN...: Sun Gospel (CD)

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Valente, Caterina: With A Song...

Inhalt: 1.0000

188,95 € *

McCaslin, Mary: Rain - The...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Alexander, Peter: Filmtreffer...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Martin, Janis: The...

Inhalt: 1.0000

12,76 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Rich, Charlie: The Sun...

Inhalt: 1.0000

47,96 € * Statt: 59,95 € *

Twitty, Conway: The...

Inhalt: 1.0000

111,96 € * Statt: 139,95 € *

Wecker, Konstantin: Live-Aufnahm...

Inhalt: 1.0000

99,95 € * Statt: 199,95 € *

Wecker, Konstantin: Zwischenräum...

Inhalt: 1.0000

99,95 € * Statt: 169,95 € *

Leander, Zarah: Kann denn...

Inhalt: 1.0000

157,95 € *

Alexander, Peter: Filmtreffer...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Alexander, Peter: Filmtreffer...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Alexander, Peter: Filmtreffer...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Temptones: Barry Glazer...

Inhalt: 1.0000

14,95 € * Statt: 15,95 € *

Day, Doris: Que Sera,...

Inhalt: 1.0000

109,95 € *

Lewis, Jerry Lee: Mercury...

Inhalt: 1.0000

151,16 € * Statt: 188,95 € *

Lewis, Jerry Lee: The Locust...

Inhalt: 1.0000

111,96 € * Statt: 139,95 € *

Lymon, Frankie &...: Complete...

Inhalt: 1.0000

75,96 € * Statt: 94,95 € *

 
 
Zuletzt angesehen